Monday, September 14, 2009

Chili Lime Salad Dressing

When it comes to salad dressing, I sometimes get tired of the same flavors. Balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil is my typical mix, but tonight I had two limes that needed to be used, and I used them for a really interesting salad dressing which I thoroughly enjoyed. Here's that recipe:

1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon Mexican chili powder (Check the label. You dont want spices with MSG or other crazy ingredients.)
1 or 2 cloves garlic, minced or grated into the mix

Pour all the ingredients into a re-sealable jar, and shake vigorously. Makes 12 oz.
This dressing took me about 3 minutes to prepare, and I will have it to enjoy for a week or two. I think you'll enjoy it, too.

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Buffalo Chicken Wings

Who doesn't love Buffalo Chicken Wings? The problem with the deep fried kind is, of course, the oil - not only the type of oil used, which is a problem in the first place, but the temperature you need to reach to deep fry the chicken wings. High temperatures de-nature oils, and render them toxic. Here is an alternative method for baking Buffalo Chicken Wings which I think you will enjoy. There is a bit of "do-ahead" preparation, but the end product is tasty and (yes) crispy, without smoking up your kitchen. (By the way, if your weather permits, you can do the "baking" on your covered bar-b-que grill if you prefer.) Here's the method:

1. Cut 12 organic, free range, antibiotic free chicken wings into halves, and pat dry. (Get them as dry as you can.)
2. Steam chicken wings for 20 minutes, giving them as much “breathing space” as you can. This can be done with a vegetable steamer inserted into a large pot, or in a bamboo steamer. The steaming will render a lot of fat from the chicken wings; and this should be taken into consideration when choosing your steaming method. Depending on the quantity of wings you are preparing, you may have to steam two batches, rather than pile the wings on top of each other during the steaming. The more breathing room the wings have, the more efficiently the fat will be rendered out of the wings.
2b. Although the steaming method is optimal, you may opt to simply boil the chicken wings for approximately 12 minutes, and then follow the rest of these directions as written. I have boiled the wings for the sake of convenience, and the end product is delicious.
3. Chill the steamed wings for at least one hour in the refrigerator.
4. Remove the wings from the refrigerator and bake them in the oven @ 425 degrees for 40 minutes, turning them over after 20 minutes. If you have a rack that fits over a 4-sided baking sheet, use it. If not, use the baking sheet without the rack.
5. As soon as you take them out of the oven, toss them in ½ cup of your choice brand of a quality Hot Sauce and 1 stick melted butter. (Use an organic butter.)
This is enough sauce for 24 wing halves.

Is all this extra preparation worth the trouble? To masses of people who are happy to eat whatever is fast and tasty, perhaps not. But to those who have done any investigation into the North American (processed) food supply, and found it inferior at so many levels, yes. It is worth it.